Flu Vaccination 2019

Help protect yourself and those around you from the flu by getting a flu shot at your local Friendlies. Vaccinations are delivered in a private consultation room by your trusted pharmacist.

Register Your Interest

Be notified when your local Friendlies is taking bookings for 2019

Why choose Friendlies?

At Friendlies we make flu shots easy.

  • Quick and convenient at your local pharmacy
  • Delivered by your trusted pharmacist
  • Available at 30 Friendlies Pharmacies across WA
  • Free for eligible HBF members*
  • While you’re in store, our friendly pharmacists can also provide expert advice about other ways to protect yourself during flu season.

Why register?

Vaccination is the most effective way of preventing and stopping the spread of flu. It will protect you and those around you who may be at increased risk of flu related complications, including older people, pregnant women and those with an underlying medical condition or reduced immunity. Vaccination against the flu reduces the more serious outcomes, like hospitalisations.

It is recommended that people are vaccinated against the influenza virus annually, as the strains of the flu virus change from year to year. This means that even if you were vaccinated against the flu in 2018, for best protection, you should be vaccinated again in 2019. Vaccination is recommended in early Autumn to allow time for immunity to be strengthened before the flu season starts.

Can I get a flu shot?

People aged 18 years or older can be vaccinated at Friendlies. 

Read the full terms and conditions for a Friendlies Flu vaccination.

HOW MUCH DOES A FLU VACCINATION COST?

The cost of a flu vaccination may vary each year. Register your interest and we’ll send you an email confirming when bookings are open and the cost of the vaccination. If you’re an HBF member, you may be fully covered for a flu vac at Friendlies*. 

SKIP-THE-FLU-SEASON

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

What is the flu?

Influenza (often called the flu) is a common, highly contagious virus that affects your respiratory system. It is not the same as the common cold. Symptoms include fever, a cough, sore throat, fatigue, muscle aches, headaches, runny nose and watery eyes.

The flu is a serious disease which can lead to complications and sometimes hospitalisation.

How do you get the flu?

The flu spreads from person to person through the air when someone coughs, sneezes or talks. You can also catch the flu from touching a contaminated surface or someone’s hand with the virus on it and then touching your mouth, eyes or nose.

Who is most at risk of the flu?

People with an underlying medical condition or reduced immunity are most at risk of influenza related complications and should be vaccinated. They include:

  • anyone aged 65 years and over
  • pregnant women (at any stage of pregnancy)
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 6 months to less than 5 years and 15 years and over
  • people aged 6 months and over with heart disease, chronic lung disease, chronic neurological conditions, down syndrome, impaired immunity or haemoglobinopathies (blood disorders caused by genetic changes)
  • people with other chronic conditions such as obesity, alcoholism, diabetes and kidney disease
  • residents in nursing homes or other long-term care facilities
  • people who are homeless
  • people with severe asthma who visit hospital frequently
  • children on long-term aspirin therapy
  • people with other chronic illnesses requiring regular medical follow-up or hospitalisation.

Why is it important to have a flu vaccination?

Vaccination is the most effective way of preventing and stopping the spread of the flu. It will protect you and those around you who may be at increased risk of flu related complications, including older people, pregnant women and those with an underlying medical condition or reduced immunity.

Vaccinating against the flu helps to reduce the chance of more serious outcomes like hospitalisation and death.

Do I need to get a flu vaccination every year?

The flu virus strains can change from year to year, and because immunity from vaccination is not long lasting, annual vaccination is required. Vaccination is recommended in early autumn to allow time for immunity to be strengthened before the flu season starts. 

Are there any side effects of the flu shot?

Some people may experience mild side effects following vaccination, such as:

  • drowsiness or tiredness
  • muscle aches
  • localised pain, redness and/or swelling at the injection site
  • occasionally, an injection-site lump that may last several weeks
  • low-grade temperature (fever)

These side effects are usually mild, subside within a few days and do not normally require treatment.

More severe immediate adverse effects, such as hives or anaphylaxis, are very rare consequences of influenza vaccination. Your pharmacist is trained to recognise and manage any immediate, severe reactions.

Your pharmacist will also carry out a pre-screening assessment before vaccinating you to ensure the vaccine is suitable for you.

Are the vaccines delivered by qualified people?

At Friendlies, vaccinations are delivered by pharmacists who have successfully completed accredited Department of Health training for the administration of vaccinations as well as first aid, CPR and anaphylaxis training.

Can I bring my children to be vaccinated at the pharmacy?

No, legislation in Western Australia currently dictates that pharmacists can only administer influenza vaccinations to people aged 18 years and over.

Is the flu vaccine safe?

The flu vaccine passes stringent Government safety testing before being approved for use. Some people may experience mild side effects such as tenderness and/or redness at the injection site. This usually clears within a few days.

More severe immediate adverse effects, such as hives or anaphylaxis, are very rare consequences of influenza vaccination. Your pharmacist is trained to recognise and manage any immediate, severe reactions.

Your pharmacist will also carry out a pre-screening assessment before vaccinating you to ensure the vaccine is suitable for you.

Does the flu vaccine work straight away?

Protection from a flu vaccine does not occur immediately. It takes approximately two weeks for your immune system to form antibodies which will provide protection. That’s why it’s better to be vaccinated early before the flu season really gets under way.

Can you get the flu from a flu vaccine?

The viruses in the flu vaccine are not capable of causing the flu as they are inactive or ‘dead’. When you receive a flu vaccination, your immune system’s response is to form antibodies which will provide protection. Sometimes, flu-like symptoms may occur within 6-12 hours of receiving the vaccine and last 1-2 days. This is a reaction common to many vaccines. 

 

When will the vaccine be available?

The 2019 quadrivalent vaccine is expected to be available in March, subject to passing stringent Government safety testing.

*For members on eligible products, up to the annual maximum. Service eligibility applies.